• jennifer 1 preview

    Here’s page 1 of my next comic book, Jennifer Wilde. Art and lettering are by the talented Stephen Downey. If you hop over to the web site you can see page 2 and 3 as well. It’s a little naughty, but this is the art scene in 1921 in Paris! Today The Irish Times published an article called “The brave new world of comic-book heroines“, written by Sinéad Gleeson. It looks at the women who are emerging on the Irish comic book scene at the moment. I’m one of the women featured in the piece. Earlier in the year when I assembled the list of women working in comic books…

  • DC's Mad Hatter tea party

    News and reaction to DC’s reboot of 52 titles in its catalogue this September has been rumbling on since I blogged about it last week. First I’d like to forefront a couple of repsonses that contain useful insight for the DC executives. Comic Book Resources put up part of a fantastic discussion with Dan Harmon, the creator of the comedy TV show Community, about creating a writing staff with an even gender split. It’s called “We have to stop thinking of it as a quota thing and think of it as a common-sense thing” Here’s an extract: There’s the same percentage of genius happening in both genders, but there’s less…

  • embracing the paradox

    http://video.ted.com/assets/player/swf/EmbedPlayer.swf This TED Talk called Reinventing Feminism is by Courtney Martin, feminist, journalist, activist and editor at Feministing.com. It’s a fine overview of feminism in the 21st century and why women should continue to agitate for change despite the times when the issues seem overwhelming. I found it personally inspiring. It reminds me that our moments of despair often contain the seeds of what can save us eventually. If we care deeply about issues it’s inevitable that lack of progress or failure will cast us into a depression. It’s okay to falter because it matters so much. That’s also the best motivation to keep striving for change.

  • 2% is not equality

    The comic book blogosphere has been obsessed by one topic of conversation lately: the reboot of the DC Comics Universe that’s coming in September. All the forthcoming 52 titles will be reset to number 1, which (theoretically) will leave the creative teams free to forge new identities for the characters. Information has been released to the fans about the forthcoming changes in a slow-drip fashion. It’s a cunning PR strategy to inflame interest and discussion about the direction DC is taking. They’ll also be offering digital downloads of the comics on the same day as the print release, which is a big indicator of where they think the market is…

  • be part of the solution

    It’s no surprise to any of my regular readers that I’ve considered myself a feminist from the moment I understood what it meant. Most importantly, I have always stated that fact without embarrassment or the need for a self-deprecating modifier (‘but I like men!’, ‘but I never burned a bra!’, etc. etc.). Yet, for me it comes with a responsibility. I always remember that it’s due to the legacy of action by past feminists that I enjoy the right to vote, as well as a raft of anti-discrimination legislation. It’s up to succeeding generations of women to continue their mission for equality and fair treatment for everyone (irrespective of gender,…

  • Through a Girl’s Eyes

    I’ve mentioned before that I sponsor a girl in India through the fantastic aid agency Plan Ireland, which is part of an international child sponsorship organisation. I’ve always been impressed that it pays so much attention to the experience of girls in developing countries, as can be seen by its Because I am a Girl campaign. Earlier this year Plan Ireland asked me to contribute to their Because I am a Girl Blog. As you’ll see from the promotional banner Plan Ireland has been staging a photography exhibition – focusing on the lives of girls in developing countries – around the country and it’s now coming to Galway. It’s called…

  • altered in post

    I took this picture a few days ago to accompany a guest blog post which went up today on the Irish women’s web site The Anti-Room. The blog entry is called ‘Fly in the Foundation‘, and it’s about those dreadful ads on TV for beauty products (mascara and hair extensions in particular). It was a subject I’d been meaning to blog about so it popped into my mind when I was asked to guest post over at the site. A special hat tip to The Anti-Room’s talented editors Sinéad Gleeson and Anna Carey.

  • Kapow! – with added women

    The Kapow! Comic Book convention is going on this weekend, and it’s good to see that in the face of criticism over its initial all-male line-up the event has adjusted its guest list. I was not the only one who pointed out the lack of women, and I’m not claiming this result is due to my input alone. Honestly, this is a positive response, and I hope it means more women featured at the event (if they hold it again) when they have time to include women in the planning from the very beginning. Millar is even talking up the female angle now, mentioned a 30% female readership in this…

  • just the facts ma'am

    I’d like to add a few observations based on my last piece of detective work, and other similar projects I’ve tackled regarding re-adjusting the representation of women in creative fields. I’ve often been frustrated at how difficult it is to discover basic information like how many women work in a certain field with any accuracy. Wikipedia, for instance, is very inconsistent with its category listings, and more importantly: Women creators are often not listed in Wikipedia, or their entries are insubstantial. This exacerbates the perceived ‘lack’ of women in a field. If someone can’t Google the information and get a quick answer in the top ten entries then an assumption…

  • women in comics in UK/Ireland – overview

    There are occasions when perhaps it’s best not to promise a blog post on a subject. Regular readers might remember that in January I commented upon the utter lack of women comic book guests at the forthcoming Kapow! comic book convention in London. This was followed by an entry in which I posted a number of women artists/writers working in the field in the UK (and Ireland), with a promise to put together a much more detailed listing of women working in the field. The follow-up post has been a long time coming because: There are loads of women working in comics in the UK and Ireland People might remember…