• Film,  Ireland,  News,  Screenwriting,  Theatre

    one for the calendar

    IFTN mentions an event that should interest Irish screenwriters, playwrights, and film aficionados. A new play by New York playwright and Oscar-winning screenwriter John Patrick Shanley (Moonstruck, Alive) will debut in Ireland on Thursday 26th October at the Abbey Theatre. The Tony-winning play is called Doubt, and is set in a Bronx Catholic school in 1964. Following the premier of the play there will be a free post-show event, which will start around 9.30pm. Oscar nominated Irish writer/director Jim Sheridan (My Left Foot, In America) will be “In Conversation” with John Patrick Shanley, and the two men will discuss the play, Hollywood, and filmmaking. It should be an event well…

  • Galway,  Reviews,  Theatre

    hike to your theatre

    Tonight I attended the Druid Theatre Company‘s version of the John B. Keane play, The Year of the Hiker. It was originally produced in 1963, and this Druid production is the final instalment of a trilogy of Keane’s plays that the company has tackled (Sharon’s Grave (2003) and Sive (2002)). Recently, I’ve been making a concerted effort to attend more plays. Theatre is a completely different animal than cinema, but it offers great insights into drama and characters. It’s interesting to note what works in a play, but would not in a film. There is something extraordinarily visceral in a live performance, which is completely lacking in a movie. Intense…

  • Reviews,  Theatre,  Thoughts

    the price of a pint dictates all

    Hurray, it’s May! I was away a lot in April, hence the absence of entries. Last month was unpredictable, rather like our famous Spring weather, and I’m glad it’s over. That last sentence evokes in my mind T.S. Eliot’s The Wasteland in two ways: April is the cruellest month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixingMemory and desire, stirringDull roots with spring rain. And She turns and looks a moment in the glass,Hardly aware of her departed lover;Her brain allows one half-formed thought to pass:‘Well now that’s done: and I’m glad it’s over.’When lovely woman stoops to folly and Paces about her room again, alone,She smoothes her hair with…

  • Film,  Reviews,  Theatre

    We are all born mad. Some remain so.

    Samuel Beckett is the type of dramatist that people love or hate. Some see his theatre as an elitist, alienating joke, while others view it as truth unveiled in minimalist simplicity. Here in Ireland there have been a huge number of events–on television, in the cinema, on the radio, in the theatres, and in exhibitions–this month to celebrate the centenary of Beckett’s birth. I’ve been dipping in and out of James Knowlson’s incredibly detailed biography of Beckett, Damned to Fame, which is very good. Last week Atom Egoyan, the Canadian film director, came to Galway to discuss his work in an afternoon lecture, and then introduce his version of Krapp’s…

  • Reviews,  Theatre

    all the world's a play

    On Monday night I attended the premier of The Walworth Farce by Irish playwright Edna Walsh. It’s a Druid Theatre production, directed by Mikel Murfi, and starring Syan Blake, Denis Conway, Garrett Lombard and Aaron Monaghan. The play reminds me of a quote by Shakespeare from his excellent comedy, As you Like It: “All the world’s a stage,And all the men and women merely players.They have their exits and their entrances;And one man in his time plays many parts,” I’ll note upfront that I don’t attend the theatre regularly, although it is an art form that I enjoy. There is much to like about The Walworth Farce, however the current…

  • Screenwriting,  Theatre

    star light, star bright

    I’ve been reading The Art of Dramatic Writing by Lajos Egri recently. It’s one of those books that writers tend to lavish praise upon, so it’s been on my “to read” list for some time. The first chapter on premise is particularly good, and pretty much echoes the conventional advice I’ve gleaned about how to start a project: make sure your premise (or concept) is solid. This is partly why the progress bar on the right has not advanced, because I’m worrying at my concept. I don’t want to advance further into the outline stage until I’m certain about my central concept. In the meantime I’ve written another piece of…