finding a new way out

Work progresses on my script, which yesterday underwent a metamorphosis and became something else. I’m not sure it can truly be called a horror film any more. I’ll be better able to judge when it’s done.

While I was working on the concept level for the film I stumbled upon a cool horror element and tried to make it a major part of the script. Alas, it couldn’t work, because that is a different film than the one I want to write now: intense, character-focused, low-budget. I put that story idea into the bank, and I’ll withdraw it at another date. It will be a lot happier when it has its own dramatic stage. This necessitated an entirely new vision of my current project. I’m happy with it so far, but we’ll see if I’m still enamoured when I hit the middle section…

I haven’t blogged a lot this month. It’s usually a symptom that I’m occupied elsewhere, and I suspect my (week)daily blogging on behalf of the Guild is tapping out my drive to write on my personal journal. Still, it means I’m current with the state of the film industry, which is useful.

The exciting news is that I finally booked our flights to Japan for this year’s Worldcon. Martin and I will be going to London for a few days, where I will attend FrightFest. Afterwards we will board a plane to Tokyo, and go straight to Yokohama for the convention. Several of my Clarion West classmates will be in attendance. I’m very excited to see them again, and for Martin to meet some of the people he’s heard so much about. Once that wraps we’ll be spending another 10 days experiencing Japan. It’s the one country I’ve always wanted to visit since I was a kid. The trip might bankrupt us, but at least I can tick that box on the life checklist.

Martin showed me an incredible clip today from a French film called Banlieue 13 (District 13). It’s an extended sequence that highlights the French art called parkour, and is executed with fantastic finesse by David Belle, one of its founders. Free running is an outgrowth of parkour, but those in the know seem to insist on sharp differences. The clip is a gripping spectacle. I wonder if the entire film can be as good as that taster. I will have to rent it and find out.

Those of you who read this blog might remember me raving about Don Hertzfeldt of Bitter Films some time ago. Today I saw another of his twisted little films, “Billy’s Balloon”. Give it a chance. Just as you think perhaps the story has plateaued Hertzfeldt kicks it up a notch for its weird dark conclusion. It’s brilliant.